Direct-to-Customer Commerce

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Strategic insights into the direct commerce industry, including ecommerce, direct marketing and related fields

How Seamless Are You?

How Seamless Are You? is a study by Accenture on omni-channel retailing, from the customer’s point-of-view.

In my review, I found nothing earth shattering … because it told me what I expected:  customers want to be able to do business with you on their terms, rather than on yours.

Customers expect uniformity in products, pricing and promotions across all available channels.

So, if your organization is complaining about the negative impact of “show rooming” on your sales, then you should immediately consider the fact that your business may not be competitive in these three areas.

There seems to be some reluctance, among some retailers, to recognize that you win and keep customers by being the best company to buy from.  That may mean the best products, or the best prices, or the most attractive promotions.

But you can’t just sit there doing everything like you’ve always done things and expect to preserve your place in the market.  You must be better at something.

You must be more convenient, have a better selection, more available inventory, lower prices … something that differentiates you.

The principles of success have not changed … only the tactics required to implement those principles in the most effective way.

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Filed under: News, Omni-Channel Commerce, Opinion, , , , , , , ,

The Impact of Omni-channel on Retail

The Wall Street Journal published a story this week about Macy’s, which focuses mostly only the perceived impact that an omni-channel strategy is having on their business, going forward.  It’s worth reading here. (subscription required)

What struck me in this story is the twist on the concept of localization.

Most of my conversations with ecommerce folks, in which “localization” comes up, the subject is a reference to localizing a web site to a country.  And, of course, the resulting need for translation, alternate payment processing methods, separating inventory, separating marketing campaigns.  All to be expected.

What Macy’s professes to recognizing is that a store in Fairfax, Virginia (where I live) may demand a different inventory and different marketing than a store in Dallas, Texas.

Now, we’ve all recognized those type of differences — up to a point.

But with the tools available to us now, we can buy uniquely for each store, vary marketing by micro-segment, and attempt to match available inventory (and by extension our merchandising & buying tactics) to these clearly identifiable segments.

But where is the balance … can we focus one segments that are so small, we cannot manage to them profitably? And if that’s true, then what is the smallest segment we should isolate to maximize profitability?

A whole new form of optimization!

 

Filed under: Direct Commerce, Ideas, multichannel commerce, Opinion, , , , , , , , , ,

Customers are thinking Omnichannel … and Brands should, too

worth reading, from Chief Marketer

Filed under: News, , ,

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